We often get asked about the differences between hooks, how they work, how much weight they hold, how big are they and which hangers do they go on. Though we usually start a discussion with our customers with the details of the where the rail will be installed to determine which kind of rail that they need to use it is of course equally as important as the kind of hangers and hooks used which completes the system.

To break down the detail of the hooks to hopefully give a clearer overview and each hooks individual benefits please read through the following information:

HM – The HM hook is our starting point due to the weight it holds on nylon hangers (4kgs).

  • The hook is made from one piece, chrome-plated spring steel, the spring action of the hook is the mechanism that grips the nylon hanger and tapered holes in the top of the hook clasp around the hanger making the hook capable of holding up to 4kgs each. The hook can be easily adjusted by squeezing it together and self locks when released.
  • Because there are no moving parts of the hook itself it is extremely robust and equally reliable.

HC – A more manual hook with a thumbscrew that holds up to 5kgs on nylon hangers.

  • The HC hook is a more traditional hook with a rounded pin thumbscrew that means the part that clamps the nylon hanger is rounded and as long as the thumbscrew isn’t over tightened it won’t mark the nylon hanger.
  • The hook is made from a diecast metal and then chrome-plated

HZ – Our most popular hook, holding up to 10kgs each on nylon hangers and 15kgs each on steel hangers.

  • Being able to be used on both nylon and steel hangers gives the user an advantage of having fewer things to worry about, mixing hanger types of nylon and steel is a common thing to do in galleries where there is a mix of pictures moving through it.
  • Made of various metals this hook is a self-locking hook with a push-button on the side allowing for precision adjustment.
  • Internally there is a cam mechanism that grips the nylon or steel hanger. The more weight that is applied to the hook the tighter it grips.
  • Unable to be used on steel hangers that are less than 1.8mm in diameter.

HP – A two-part hook that fits around nylon or steel, up to 8kgs.

  • The two-part fastening makes this die-cast hook ideal for hangers that are fixed at the top and bottom making it hard to slide hooks on from the end of the hanger.
  • This hook features a latch for securing the frame via a D-ring or Straphanger.
  • Unable to be used on steel hangers that are less than 1.8mm in diameter.

HL – A strong hook for steel hangers holding up to 20kgs each.

  • Made from various metals and with a plastic button on top for adjusting up and down.
  • A tapered ball-bearing mechanism inside means that the hanger is gripped in three places for maximum strength.
  • The tapered barrel that houses the ball-bearing mechanism means that the more weight that is applied to the hooks the tighter it is going to grip.

HQ – A strong self-locking hook with a latch that can hold up to 15kgs

  • Made from various metals.
  • A tapered ball-bearing mechanism inside means that the hanger is gripped in three places for maximum strength.
  • The tapered barrel that houses the ball-bearing mechanism means that the more weight that is applied to the hooks the tighter it is going to grip.
  • A sprung latch that clicks closed when a D-ring or Straphanger is inserted to the hook for secure hanging.

HT – The strongest, holding up to 30kgs on steel hangers

  • Made from various metals including a flat steel hook.
  • A tapered ball-bearing mechanism inside means that the hanger is gripped in three places for maximum strength.
  • The tapered barrel that houses the ball-bearing mechanism means that the more weight that is applied to the hooks the tighter it is going to grip.

All hooks are made to be used on 2mm nylon or 1.8mm steel hangers.

 

By Luke Norman